SPCA Transports: Giving them a second chance

Fly to Ithaca or face euthanasia? Those are the choices for high-kill shelters. We choose Ithaca. But we need your help to continue to save more lives.

A fundraising campaign for SPCA of Tompkins County

River's Journey:

My name is River, but I was once a very sad and unhealthy dog named Greta. 

I am just one of the 250 dogs the SPCA of Tompkins County transported to Ithaca from high-kill shelters all over the U.S. since 2015. Gifts from people like you have saved dogs like me.

Before I was lucky enough to have a home with a warm bed, a cat sister, Maggie (also an SPCA alumna), and regular walks on a leash, I was once an owner surrender at a high-kill shelter in Mississippi. 

I had very poor body condition, bad arthritis in my elbows, and on top of all that I was grossly overweight at 93 pounds. Because of my size no one wanted to adopt me. I was in real danger of being euthanized.

Wings of Rescue

On February 14, 2017, I landed in Buffalo, NY in a very special airplane filled with more than 100 dogs from the southern part of the United States.  Crate after crate was pulled off the plane, one specifically designed for high-volume dog rescue through an amazing organization, Wings of Rescue.

Rhonda, Mason, Rhodes, Maverick, Leevi, Jaguar, Java, Tyrone, Shaba, Jacqueline, Casey, Laci and Jackson were among the many on the plane with me.  We were scared out of our wits,  but an airplane ride to Ithaca was better than certain euthanasia. 

Jim Bouderau, the executive director of the SPCA of Tompkins County, and loyal dog volunteer, Lyndsey Williams, were there to meet us and bring us home.  In our video, you can see Jim walking among the crates looking for the ones labelled for Tompkins County.

A home!  I found a home!

Fast-forward seventeen days later:  I found my forever home with Scott and Susan on March 2.  I never have to worry again about being euthanized for a lack of space in a shelter or rescue. Of the Valentine's Day dogs, I was one of the last to be adopted due to my weight problem, size, and health issues.  But look at me now!  Slimmer, much happier, well-cared for, tremendously loved, and frankly, ALIVE.

I am tail-waggingly grateful that the SPCA of Tompkins County is one of the shelters leading the movement in embracing--and funding--animal transports from high-kill shelters.

In 2016 alone, the SPCA of Tompkins County transported 144 dogs from 16 different shelters all over the south as well as 13 cats from regional shelters.  In 2017, the shelter continues to bring dogs and cats destined for euthanasia to Ithaca and will have a additional transports in May and June. Your gifts to the SPCA have made these transports possible.

How you can help:

Will you please make a gift today to allow the SPCA to continue saving cats and dogs like me from certain euthanasia?




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About the Organization

SPCA of Tompkins County

The mission of the SPCA of Tompkins County is to protect companion animals. We are the first open admission, no-kill shelter in the United States, and are dedicated to preventing animal cruelty and overpopulation. In 2016, we are celebrating 15 years as a no-kill shelter!

The SPCA of Tompkins County was incorporated in February 1902 in an effort to prosecute individual cases of cruelty.

In 1904, the organization acquired sheltering facilities and took over as ‘pound master’ for some of the municipalities within the county. For much of its history, the SPCA has employed humane officers to investigate individual cases of cruelty, as well as providing impound, sheltering and adoption of unwanted dogs, cats, and other animals.

In 1999, the SPCA Board of Directors resolved to become a "no-kill" shelter, a vision fully realized by the end of 2001. In the spring of 2004, the SPCA opened the Dorothy and Roy Park Pet Adoption Center, a sheltering facility that provides dogs, cats and other companion animals with comfortable, healthy, home-like settings. Registered as the...

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